6 of the best: tubeless pumps and inflators

Seat your tubeless tyres quickly and easily with our pick of the pumps

Tubeless tyres are a great solution to puncture-free riding, but setting up a tubeless tyre can sometimes be tricky and getting the tyre seated can take some practice too, and a good pump and/or inflator.

So here are six of the best that we've tested.

Specialized Air Tool Blast

BikeRadar score4.5/5

Specialized's Air Tool Blast needs to be pumped up to a max 140psi
Specialized's Air Tool Blast needs to be pumped up to a max 140psi

Price: £45

This 2.32kg tyre setter is 50cm tall with a 1,450cc air canister and a stable steel base. Fill the canister to the recommended maximum 140psi via a top-mounted Schrader valve, and flip the side-mounted lever to release air through its hose.

It’s effective, seating a 33mm ’cross tyre on the third blast, and a 28mm road tyre immediately.

Specialized

Topeak Joe Blow Booster

BikeRadar score4.5/5

To fill the Joe Blow Booster's chamber takes 40 strokes
To fill the Joe Blow Booster's chamber takes 40 strokes

• Price: £140 / $156.32 / AU$203

This 3.35kg beast has a long hose, a 1-litre aluminium chamber alongside a good-sized pump barrel and a 160psi max pressure. Forty strokes fills the chamber, and a quick flip of the dial and a few extra pumps simply seated the CX and road tyres.

Not cheap, but the best combined system, with huge reach, a simple head and great operation.

Topeak

Zefal Tubeless Tank

BikeRadar score4.5/5

The Zefal Tubeless Tank is a good option if you don't need a track pump
The Zefal Tubeless Tank is a good option if you don't need a track pump

• Price: £65 / $84.99 / AU$114.99

The novel design has a 1-litre aluminium tank within a body incorporating a 96cm hose with push-on Presta valve. Holding the foot pedal down releases the air — recommended pressure is 145psi — seating the 28mm road tyre in seconds, and the CX tyre in two blasts.

If you don’t need a track pump, this is the most effective option.

Zefal

Lezyne Digital Pressure Over Drive

BikeRadar score4/5
The Lezyne Digital Pressure Over Drive has a maximum pressure of 220psi
The Lezyne Digital Pressure Over Drive has a maximum pressure of 220psi

• Price: £140 / $TBC / AU$230

The Lezyne weighs 2.45kg and we found it accurate, though the chuck can be hard to disengage. Maximum pressure is 220psi and 54 strokes will get you to 160psi.

Our CX tyre seated quickly at 180psi with minimal extra pumping, and a 28mm road tyre was easily set up at 125psi.

Lezyne

Bontrager TLR Flash Charger

BikeRadar score3.5/5
The Bontrager TLR Flash Charger combines a pump and charging canister
The Bontrager TLR Flash Charger combines a pump and charging canister

• Price: £100 / $112 /AU$145

Combining a pump and charging canister, the Flash is easy to use, though the plastic handle feels a little cheap, and the gauge isn’t that accurate at low pressures.

Forty smooth strokes reach the 160psi limit. Our CX tyre needed additional inflation, but the 28mm tyre seated instantly.

Bontrager

Schwalbe Tyre Booster

BikeRadar score3.5/5

There's no base on the Schwalbe Tyre Booster so it can move about a bit
There's no base on the Schwalbe Tyre Booster so it can move about a bit

• Price: £60

Compact and portable, the 160psi cylinder’s top cap has a Presta valve and 54cm hose with a fiddly Presta/Schrader screw-on valve.

With no base it squirms between pump and wheel, but the hose uses its average air volume to good effect, seating our 28mm tyre on the first attempt, and CX tyre on the second, with help from the track pump.

Schwalbe

This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

Robin Wilmott

Tech Writer, Tech Hub, UK,
Robin began road cycling in 1988, and with mountain bikes in their infancy, mixed experimental off-road adventures with club time trials and road races. Cyclocross soon became a winter staple, and has remained his favourite form of competition. Robin has always loved the technical aspect of building and maintaining bikes, and several years working in a good bike shop only amplified that. Ten years as a Forensic Photographer followed, honing his eye for detail in pictures and words. He has shot at the biggest pro events since the '90s, and now he's here, drawing on all those experiences to figure out what makes a bike or component tick.
  • Discipline: Road, cyclocross, time trials
  • Beer of Choice: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Related Articles

Back to top