5 reasons your next bike should be a cyclocross bike

Working to the formula n+1=CX

Buying a bike is a big decision not only because bikes are expensive, but because you’re probably going to be spending a lot of time with your chosen ride for a while.

With a new wheel size, style of riding and axle standard being announced seemingly every week, it can be hard to wade through all the information and varying opinions to decide what to spend your hard-earned cash on.

So, in an effort to cut through all of the noise, here are five solid reasons your next n+1 should be a cyclocross bike.

1. Versatility

Rack mounts and knobby tires allow 'cross bikes to be extremely versatile
Rack mounts and knobby tires allow 'cross bikes to be extremely versatile

Not long ago it was hard to find a ’cross bike that had bolts for a bottle cage, but now bike brands have cottoned on to how awesome CX bikes are for things that don’t necessarily revolve around mud, sandpits and flyovers.

With a set of knobby tires (which come stock on a 'cross bike) you’re ready to hit the trail, gravel, mud, sand and just about anything else. But, if you throw a set of slicks on you’ll blend in just fine on a roadie group ride, just don’t forget your #sockdoping socks.

They make great commuters with a comfortable, relatively upright riding position and wheels and tires designed to take a beating. With a set of fenders a ’cross bike is just about the perfect ride to get you from point A to point B and back.

The rack, fender and pannier mounts, and their ability to tackle varied terrain, also mean they make for great touring rigs too.

The advent of gravel bikes has muddied the waters a bit with geometries very similar to CX bikes, but often with more tire clearance and the ability to run 700c, 650b wheels and wider range gearing.

Even still, most CX bikes can handle substantially bigger tires than the UCI-mandated 33c rubber, and a quick cassette swap will leave you with a capable gravel racer. In fact, the previous generation Specialized CruX was a favorite gravel racer among BikeRadar staffers, and we're even seeing some brands such as Canondale repackage CX race frames as gravel bikes with little more than a few component swaps.

2. Winter bike

With the ability to tackle on and off piste terrain a CX bike will allow you to explore more of your surrounding area
With the ability to tackle on and off piste terrain a CX bike will allow you to explore more of your surrounding area

While it’s not really much of an issue in Australia, in the UK and certain areas of the US having a winter and summer bike is almost a necessity, especially where it snows.

Snow-packed roads, gravel dumped by snow plows, and black ice can be a bit too much for your race-ready roadie. The longer wheelbase offers a bit of added stability in low-traction situations and the slightly shorter top tube and more upright geometry put you in a better position to control the bike when things get squirrely.

CX bikes also have a bit of extra tire clearance so when the snow, ice and general grime that comes with winter arrives it won't slow you down.

3. The most fun you’ve had on two wheels

'Cross bikes bear a striking resemblance to road bikes, but they are much more capable
'Cross bikes bear a striking resemblance to road bikes, but they are much more capable

’Cross racing started as a way for road racers in 1900s' Europe to stay fit during the winter. They would race each from one town to another but were allowed to cut through farmers' fields or over fences, or take any other shortcuts, in order to get there first.

Having evolved from a winter pastime for pro roadies, the bikes are designed to handle a bit of everything, but lack the specificity of other bike genres. Compared to a mountain bike a ’crosser is not particularly capable and your road bike will be much faster, more efficient and probably weighs less too. But that's part of what makes these burly drop bar bikes so much fun.

That bit of fire trail near your house that’s beyond boring on a mountain bike is gangbusters on 33c knobby tires. Same goes for that washboard and loose gravel road that’s terrifying on your roadie, it's no sweat on a CX bike. Being just good enough at everything a ’cross bike will allow you to explore new roads and trails in your area and have more fun on your bike.

4. Skills

Riding a CX bike will help you to improve your handling skills
Riding a CX bike will help you to improve your handling skills

Riding a cyclocross bike will make you into a better rider especially when you leave the pavement. Because the skinnier tires have less grip and don’t roll over roots and rocks like MTB tires, you have to work harder to maintain control over your bike.

All of this sliding through corners, fishtailing in the mud, skidding on gravel will teach you not to panic when things go a bit sideways and help you develop the skills needed to keep things upright when disaster strikes both on and off road.

5. Racing

This writer's favorite part about CX racing is the mud
This writer's favorite part about CX racing is the mud

Cyclocross racing is the fastest growing segment of racing and for good reason, it’s also the most fun!

The races last about an hour, and like criteriums, are based on a time limit rather than a set distance. However, unlike criteriums, you’re not screaming around a track in a tight bunch where a lapse in concentration leads to a pile of mangled carbon and loads of road rash. When you crash in a cyclocross race, you’ll probably do it with a smile on your face.

The races often take place in your everyday suburban park on a closed course and are essentially an obstacle course, but for bikes that involve riding, running, jumping and sometimes even crawling under obstacles.

The Flash does occasionally make an appearance at your local cyclocross race
The Flash does occasionally make an appearance at your local cyclocross race

What's more fun is the atmosphere, it feels a bit more like a party than a race. No CX event is complete without costumes, beer and a rubber chicken or two. Oh and there's mud, and who doesn’t love getting a little muddy?

Have you got a ’cross bike? Have we missed anything? Let us know in the comments.

This article was updated 4 January 2018

Colin Levitch

Staff Writer, Australia
Originally from Denver, Colorado, Colin now resides in Sydney, Australia. Holding a media degree, Colin is focused on the adventure sport media world. Coming from a ski background, his former European pro father convinced him to try collegiate crit racing. Although his bright socks say full roadie, he enjoys the occasional mountain bike ride, too.
  • Discipline: Road, mountain
  • Preferred Terrain: Tarmac mountain climbs into snow-covered hills
  • Current Bikes: BMC TeamMachine SLR01, Trek Top Fuel 9
  • Dream Bike: Mosaic Cycles RT-1
  • Beer of Choice: New Belgium La Folie
  • Location: Sydney, Australia

Related Articles

Back to top