How to watch the 2019 Spring Classics

Our complete guide to this year’s Spring Classics coverage, from the opening weekend to the Ardennes

After seeing Philippe Gilbert win the Paris–Roubaix last weekend, we're gearing up for the Ardennes to kick off with the Amstel Gold Race this Sunday (21 April). Here’s everything we currently know about where you can find live coverage and highlights in the UK, US and Australia of the 2019 Spring Classics.

The Spring Classics 2019 overview

The term ‘Classics’ acts as a bit of an umbrella that encompasses a range of events. Included in this are the two Opening Weekend races: Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and Kuurne–Brussel–Kuurne.

These are followed by further one-day Classics races: Milan–San Remo, E3 Binckbank Classic, Gent–Wevelgem, Tour of Flanders, Scheldeprijs and Paris–Roubaix.

After Paris-Roubaix, the Ardennes Classics kicks off including Amstel Gold Race, La Flèche Wallonne and Liège–Bastogne–Liège.

The Monuments refers to the five oldest and most prestigious races in the season: Milan–San Remo, Tour of Flanders, Paris–Roubaix, Liège–Bastogne–Liège and Il Lombardia. We’ve not listed all of these, or kept them together due to overlap, but some are included below. We’ve also included Strade Bianche, which isn’t traditionally one of the Classics, but is fast becoming one with many of the top Classics contenders riding it.

How can I watch the Spring Classics 2019 live in the UK?

Eurosport has the rights to all 2019 UCI WorldTour races, so it will be showing live coverage of all the Spring Classics races listed below. You can subscribe for £9.99 per month or £39.99 per year.

Or you can access the Eurosport Player through Amazon Prime. It costs £6.99 per month on top of Prime membership, which is a requirement to access the player. Amazon Prime comes with a 30-day free trial and costs £7.99 per month after that.

One final way of accessing Eurosport is via TVPlayer, as part of its Premium Plan. This comes with the first month free and then costs £6.99 per month or £69.90 annually (which gives you two free months).

How can I watch the Spring Classics 2019 live in the US?

You can catch live coverage of several Spring Classics on FuboTV, including Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, Strade Bianche, Milan-San Remo, Gent-Wevelgem, Amstel Gold Race and Scheldeprijs. A ‘Basic’ plan is $44.99 per month (though the first month is discounted to $39.99). You can also get a free trial.

FloSports Media will be broadcasting live coverage of the Spring Classics on its FloBikes channel. Plans start at $12.50 per month.

If you have the NBC Sports Gold Cycling Pass, they're showing Paris–Roubaix, La Flèche Wallonne and Liège–Bastogne–Liège.

How can I watch the Spring Classics 2019 live in Australia?

As far as we can tell, SBS will be showing live coverage of some but not all of the Spring Classics 2019 races. Luckily for you Aussie readers, there’s no fee!

From what we can gather, SBS will be airing live coverage of the Tour of Flanders, Paris–Roubaix, Amstel Gold Race, La Flèche Wallonne, and Liège–Bastogne–Liège. .

How can I follow the Spring Classics 2019 if I can’t watch live coverage?

As far as we know, all channels listed above that are providing coverage should also be showing highlights, though we’d recommend checking their individual broadcast schedules.

The Cyclingoo app provides racing results and news, and covers the entire cycling season including the Monuments, Spring Classics and more.

And Cyclingnews will be providing live text coverage of each race if you can't tune in.

Spring Classics 2019 schedule

Opening weekend

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad — Saturday 2 March

The Spring Classics kick off with Omloop Het Nieuwsblad on Saturday 2 March
The Spring Classics kick off with Omloop Het Nieuwsblad on Saturday 2 March

  • Distance: 200km
  • Location: Belgium

The 74th edition of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad marks the opening of the Belgian cycling calendar. It features many of the climbs from the Tour of Flanders, with the finale taking in both the Wall of Geraardsbergen and Bosberg, finishing in Ninove.

Kuurne–Brussel–Kuurne — Sunday 3 March

Kuurne–Brussel–Kuurne follows on Sunday 3 March, concluding the Opening Weekend
Kuurne–Brussel–Kuurne follows on Sunday 3 March, concluding the Opening Weekend

  • Distance: 206km
  • Location: Belgium

In 2019 the Kuurne–Brussel–Kuurne route is relatively the same as last year’s, setting off at Kuurne’s hippodrome towards the Volkegemberg — the first climb of many.

The final 50 kilometres are completely flat, which has led to the race becoming known as a sprinter’s classic, and it finishes with two laps of 15.3km around Kuurne.

The Cobbled Classics

Strade Bianche — Saturday 9 March

The Strade Bianche is fast becoming embedded in the Classics because so many contenders are riding it
The Strade Bianche is fast becoming embedded in the Classics because so many contenders are riding it

  • Men’s race distance: 184km
  • Women’s race distance: 136km
  • Location: Italy

This is the 13th edition of the Strade Bianche, which while young, is gaining in popularity every year. Its unpaved roads show that cobbles aren’t the only hurdle that riders need to tackle. On top of various gravel sections, the race features an uphill finish in Siena.

Milan–San Remo — Saturday 23 March

Milan–San Remo is the first Monument of the season
Milan–San Remo is the first Monument of the season

  • Distance: 291km
  • Location: Italy

The Milan–San Remo is in its 110th year, and is the first Monument of the cycling season. It’s the same route as last year, opening with a long stretch on the Po Plain and concluding with the Poggio climb, then finishing on the Via Roma in San Remo.

E3 Binckbank Classic — Friday 29 March

E3 Binckbank Classic marks the beginning of ten racing days in Flanders
E3 Binckbank Classic marks the beginning of ten racing days in Flanders

  • Distance: 203.9km
  • Location: Belgium

Formerly called the E3 Harelbeke, the E3 Binckbank has been renamed to reflect its new sponsors. It marks the opening of ten days of racing in Flanders, and features 15 sharp and challenging climbs, with all the cobbled action you could want.

Gent-Wevelgem — Sunday 31 March

Last year's Gent-Wevelgem was won by Slovakian Peter Sagan
Last year's Gent-Wevelgem was won by Slovakian Peter Sagan

  • Men’s race distance: 251.5km
  • Women’s race distance: 150km
  • Location: Belgium

This is the 81st edition of Gent–Wevelgem, the second race in what’s become known as Flemish Week. It features hills, cobbles and unpaved roads galore.

Tour of Flanders — Sunday 7 April

The Tour of Flanders is the second Monument of the season, and it's gruelling
The Tour of Flanders is the second Monument of the season, and it's gruelling

  • Men’s race distance: 267km
  • Women’s race distance: 157km
  • Location: Belgium

In its 103rd year, the Tour of Flanders is the second Monument of the season, and it’s a gruelling one filled with challenging climbs that are short, sharp and often cobbled.

Similarly to recent years, the finale follows cobbled climbs up Oude Kwaremont and Paterberg.

Scheldeprijs — Wednesday 10 April

Scheldeprijs will be the only Classics race to traverse the border between Belgium and the Netherlands
Scheldeprijs will be the only Classics race to traverse the border between Belgium and the Netherlands

  • Distance: 203km
  • Location: Netherlands

Scheldeprijs is the only race in the Spring Classics to cross the Belgium/Netherlands border. For the second year running, it will start in Terneuzen in the Netherlands and finish in Schoten, near Antwerp.

Paris–Roubaix — Sunday 14 April

Paris–Roubaix is the third Monument and lovingly nicknamed 'Hell of the North'
Paris–Roubaix is the third Monument and lovingly nicknamed 'Hell of the North'

  • Distance: 257km
  • Location: France

The third Monument, Paris–Roubaix, is also known as the ‘Hell of the North’ because it’s one of the most difficult one-day races in the Classics season alongside its location near the battlefields of the World Wars.

The race has the reputation of being one of the hardest in the sport, so expect some serious cobble action before the finish in the Roubaix Velodrome.

The Ardennes Classics

Amstel Gold Race — Sunday 21 April

The 2019 route for the Amstel Gold Race in the Netherlands is still to be finalised
The 2019 route for the Amstel Gold Race in the Netherlands is still to be finalised

  • Men’s race distance: 240km
  • Women’s race distance: 120km
  • Location: Netherlands

The first of the Ardennes Classics, the Amstel Gold Race is in its 54th year and is known for its narrow and twisting roads, and short and sharp climbs. This year will see the return of Geulhemmerberg and Bemelerberg, but the Cauberg will not be making an appearance this time around.

La Flèche Wallonne — Wednesday 24 April

La Flèche Wallonne features the Wall of Huy, with sections up to 17% gradient
La Flèche Wallonne features the Wall of Huy, with sections up to 17% gradient

  • Men’s race distance: 195.5km
  • Women’s race distance: 120km
  • Location: Belgium

This is the 83rd edition of the men’s race and 22nd of the women’s. The men’s race takes on 11 sharp hills in the Ardennes, concluding with the traditional finish at the crest of the Mur de Huy, which features sections up to 17 percent in gradient.

Liège–Bastogne–Liège — Sunday 28 April

Liège–Bastogne–Liège is the fourth Monument listed here and takes on 11 of the toughest climbs in the Ardennes
Liège–Bastogne–Liège is the fourth Monument listed here and takes on 11 of the toughest climbs in the Ardennes

  • Men’s race distance: 256km
  • Women’s race distance: 135km
  • Location: Belgium

Liège–Bastogne–Liège is one of the oldest Classics races on the cycling calendar, dating back 105 years and takes on eleven of the toughest climbs in the Ardennes.

In contrast, the women’s race is only in its third edition. It’s the fourth Monument in the season and, despite traditionally concluding in the suburb of Ans, this year it will actually finish back in Liège.

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